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Gesa Meyer

Name: Gesa Meyer           Degree:  PhD Candidate

Gesa_Meyer

I studied meteorology at the University of Bonn in Germany. I am a PhD student at the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia. I will be working on a project that investigates the potential of bioenergy, specifically how to promote healthier carbon stores in our forests and forest product streams. The increased interest in biological sources of energy is a global phenomenon driven by concerns over energy security and climate change in recent years. This development can also be observed in British Columbia (BC), where different sectors, from the government and independent power proponents, to forest companies and industry associations have increasingly advocated the production of energy from wood. Assuming that the least-carbon intensive and most sustainable forest management should be the policy objective, it remains to be questioned whether the current policy framework is an adequate response to the complexities associated with a forest’s carbon budget. The aim of our research is to collect and evaluate the data that can serve as the basis for better informed policy decisions in this context. In addition to the question of the carbon footprint of different approaches to managing interior forest and potential bioenergy supplies, economic, technological, ecological and social constraints will be considered. Findings collected in BC will offer valuable insights on climate change that can be applied in other regions of the world. Climate change is a global phenomenon but its effects can be observed locally and adaptation strategies to climate change often need to start on a local level. My awareness of climate change issues has definitely heightened since I started my studies. In watching the news, I am reminded of various related issues and possible effects of climate change world wide, every day. It is unlikely that the process of climate change can be reversed, but as a young researcher I hope to contribute to developing adaptation strategies to climate change. Joining TerreWEB as a PhD student gives me advanced opportunities in pursuing that goal and becoming a responsible academic. In my leisure time I meet with friends, go shopping or do sports. I like to spend the time outside and play tennis, go skiing, biking or windsurfing.

Thesis Topic: Investigating the potential of bioenergy, specifically how to promote healthier carbon stores in our forests and forest product streams

Supervisor: Dr. T. Andrew Black

Publications:

Journal Articles: 

1. Brown, M. G., Black, T. A., Nesic, Z., Foord, V. N., Spittlehouse, D. L., Fredeen, A. L., Bowler, R., Grant, N.J., Burton, P.J., Trofymow, J.A., Lessard, D. and Meyer, G. (2014). Evapotranspiration and canopy characteristics of two lodgepole pine stands following mountain pine beetle attack. Hydrological Processes, 28, 3326-3340. doi:10.1002/hyp.9870

2. Mathys, A., Black, T. A., Nesic, Z., Nishio, G., Brown, M., Spittlehouse, D. L., Fredeen, A. L., Bowler, R., Jassal, R.S., Grant, N.J., Burton, P.J., Trofymow, J.A. and Meyer, G. (2013). Carbon balance of a partially harvested mixed conifer forest following mountain pine beetle attack and its comparison to a clearcut. Biogeosciences, 10(8), 5451-5463. doi:10.5194/bg-10-5451-2013

Presentations:

1. Meyer, G., Black, T.A., Nesic, Z., Jassal, R.S., Grant, N.J., Spittlehouse, D.L., Fredeen, A.L., Christen, A., Foord, V.N., Bowler, R. (2015). Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency over eight years following mountain pine beetle attack in lodgepole pine stands in northern British Columbia 4th International Conference Forests and Water in a Changing Environment, Kelowna, BC, 6-9 July 2015.

2. Meyer, G., Black, T.A., Nesic, Z., et al. (2014). What have we learnt from carbon and water flux measurements following the recent mountain pine beetle epidemic in BC?. TerreWEB Open House Poster Session, Vancouver, BC, 25 Nov 2014.

3. Meyer, G., Black, T.A., Nesic, Z., Jassal, R.S., Grant, N.J., Fredeen, A.L., Spittlehouse, D.L., Christen, A., Brown, M.G., Mathys, A., Emmel, C., Bowler, R. (2014). What have we learnt from carbon and water flux measurements following the recent mountain pine beetle epidemic in BC? 31st Conference on Agricultural and Forest Meteorology/ 2ndConference on Atmospheric Biogeosciences Poster Session, Portland,OR, 12-15 May 2014.

4. Chen, J.M., Czurylowicz, P., Mo, G., Black, T.A., Meyer, G., Gonsamo, A., Wu, C. (2013). Impact of the mountain pine beetle on the forest carbon cycle in British Columbia from 1999 to 2012 Fall Meeting of American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, CA, 9-13 December 2013.

Reports:

1. Fredeen, A., Black, T.A., Meyer, G., Klopp, W. 2014. Striking the right bioenergy balance: promoting healthier carbon stores in our forests and forest product streams. PICS Research Project Final Report. Nov 2014.

2. Meyer, G., Black, T.A. (2013). Flux-tower measurements of carbon and water fluxes at mountain-pine-beetle-attacked sites in interior BC. Report to BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Victoria, BC. 29 Oct 2013.

 

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